Cumin (Cuminum Cyminum)

Powerful, green, aromatic, spicy, warm, aniseed.

Source

Cumin is mostly produced in India, Morocco, China and the Mediterranean basin countries.

Extraction Method

The aromatic seeds of a small annual plant are dried, ground and then steam distilled. They resemble caraway seeds in appearance.

Uses

Because of its potent odor, it is used in very small amounts in men's perfume and in eaux fraîches. Black cumin, a more expensive cumin grown in Kashmir and Iran is sometimes used in the cuisine of Northern India. It is used to flavor breads, liqueurs, cakes, cheeses, chili con carne, couscous, curry and different meat dishes. It is also part of the Indian combination of sweet spices of Garam Marsala.

History

Native to the Nile valley, cumin was mentioned in the Old Testament and in early Greek writings. Cumin seeds were found in the ancient tombs of the Pharoahs. The Romans used it as pepper. Less common in western cooking, cumin has become an essential spice in Indian cuisine. Medicinal properties Used in veterinary medecine. According to popular tradition, a drink with powdered cumin served to newly-weds ensures their attachment to the home.

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